April 30, 2020
april 2020 journal roundup cover

April 2020 Sports Medicine Journal Roundup

The American Journal of Sports Medicine (May 2020)

  • The incidence of Segond fractures was 7.4%

  • Accounting for the high incidence of healed Segond fractures, a much higher incidence (15%) was seen.

  • The presence of Segond fractures did not represent a higher risk of undergoing revision surgery.

  • The strongest predictors of a longer time to RTS after acute adductor injury were palpation pain at the proximal adductor longus insertion, a palpable defect, and/or an injury at the bone-tendon junction on MRI. .

  • For athletes without any of these findings, even extensive clinical and MRI examination does not assist considerably in providing a more precise estimate of time to RTS.

  • Operative repair of chronic incomplete proximal hamstring avulsion injuries enabled return to preoperative level of sporting function with no episodes of clinical recurrence at short-term follow-up.

  • Surgical intervention was associated with high patient satisfaction and improved isometric hamstring muscle strength, range of motion, and functional outcome scores as compared with preoperative values.

  • High patient satisfaction and improved functional outcomes were sustained at 2-year follow-up.

  • Patients with Achilles tendon rupture treated by percutaneous repair 14 to 30 days after injury achieved similar results at 1 year as patient treated <14 after injury.

British Journal of Sports Medicine (April 54-7, April 54-8)

  • Glucocorticoids are widely prescribed by sports physicians. There is a need to better educate sports physicians on the current WADA regulations in relation to glucocorticoid administration

  • Soccer headgear did not reduce the incidence or severity of SRC in high school soccer players

  • Injury rates in the first match after injury are higher than the average seasonal match injury rate, but the propensity for player injury is decreased when players complete more training sessions before their first match.

  • RT clinically improved treadmill and flat ground walking ability in persons with peripheral artery disease.

  • Higher intensity training was associated with better outcomes.

  • Our study makes a case for clinicians to include high-intensity lower body RT in the treatment of peripheral artery disease.

Sports Medicine (April 2020)

  • Sub-group analyses indicated that caffeine ingestion is ergogenic:

  • (a) for both mean and peak velocity;

  • (b) for movement velocity when exercising with low, moderate and high loads, and

  • (c) for movement velocity in both lower- and upper-body exercises.

  • We found evidence from RCTs indicating cost-effectiveness of some physical activity interventions for primary prevention in adults.

  • However, the majority of interventions assessed would not be cost-effective according to the benchmark applied.

  • Furthermore, our study showed that trial-based evidence on cost-effectiveness of physical activity interventions is scarce.

  • Therefore, we recommend that future studies investigating the efficacy or effectiveness of such interventions consider costs as an additional outcome and assess cost-effectiveness.

  • General research recommendations for RTP and the beliefs and practices of practitioners appear to match with the majority of teams assessing functional, clinical and psychological criteria throughout a RTP continuum to inform decision-making which is also shared among key stakeholders.

  • However, specific criteria, metrics and thresholds used, and the specific involvement, dynamics and interactions of staff during decision-making are not clear.

Sports Health Journal (March/ April 2020)

  • Modified Posterior shoulder stretching exercises, in addition to a treatment program, are beneficial for patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.

  • Both modified cross-body and sleeper stretches are safe and efficacious for improving shoulder mobility, pain, and dysfunction

  • We found evidence from RCTs indicating cost-effectiveness of some physical activity interventions for primary prevention in adults.

  • However, the majority of interventions assessed would not be cost-effective according to the benchmark applied.

  • Furthermore, our study showed that trial-based evidence on cost-effectiveness of physical activity interventions is scarce.

  • Therefore, we recommend that future studies investigating the efficacy or effectiveness of such interventions consider costs as an additional outcome and assess cost-effectiveness.

  • This comprehensive study of the risks of sustaining a fracture or dislocation from common sports activities across all age groups can aid sports health providers in a better understanding of those sports at high risk and be proactive in prevention mechanisms (protective gear, body training).

  • Targeted intervention could be easily implemented after 6 simple clinical assessment tests to subgroup patients into 1 of 3 subgroups (strong, weak and tight, and weak and pronated foot). Targeted interventions applied according to the characteristics of these subgroups have more beneficial treatment effects than a current multimodal treatment program.