Is Ketorolac (Toradol) a Safe and Effective Intra-Articular Injection?

Is Ketorolac (Toradol) a Safe and Effective Intra-Articular Injection?

Ketorolac Tromethamine, often referred by its trade name toradol, is an injectable non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). A growing utilization among orthopedists and sports medicine physicians is to use it for intra-articular analgesia and anti-inflammatory. Although generally not well studied, this article seeks to review the evidence of that indication.


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NSAIDS and Renal Complications

NSAIDS and Renal Complications

ports medicine physicians should be cognizant of potential complications, especially nephrotoxicity. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In individuals admitted to the hospital with AKI requiring emergent dialysis, mortality rates can exceed 50%. Awareness can lead to better prescribing practices and increased safety for at-risk patients.

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Frequency, Cartilage Loss and Common Complications of Corticosteroid Injections

Frequency, Cartilage Loss and Common Complications of Corticosteroid Injections

Many orthopedic practices in the United States will perform injections in 3-month intervals or more spaced out if possible.  The main reasoning behind the limitation of injections is preservation of cartilage and avoidance of side effects. There is contrasting evidence regarding repeated corticosteroid joint injections and cartilage damage.

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NSAIDS and Gastrointestinal Complications

NSAIDS and Gastrointestinal Complications

In 2013, NSAIDs had accounted for more than 70 million prescriptions and 30 billion over-the-counter purchases. Sports medicine physicians should be cognizant of potential complications, especially gastrointestinal toxicity. Awareness can lead to better prescribing practices and increased safety for at-risk patients.

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Introduction and Comparison of Corticosteroids

Introduction and Comparison of Corticosteroids

Corticosteroids are medications that are commonly injected and many people refer to these injections as “cortisone” injections.  The first corticosteroid injection was performed in 1953 and the first clinical trial was performed in 1958 1,8.  The medications are synthetically formulated to mimic the steroid hormone cortisone, which is produced by the adrenal gland and released in response to stress

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